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Resolution of the Special Committee on North Korean Abductions and Other Issues


  On December 5, 2007, the Special Committee on North Korean Abductions and Other Issues passed a Resolution opposing a move of removing North Korea from the designated list of states sponsoring terrorism.


(Unofficial translation)


Resolution opposing a move of removing North Korea from the designated list of states sponsoring terrorism


  The House of Representatives Special Committee on North Korean Abductions and Other Issues resolves as follows:
  The Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea) has abducted and continues to detain innocent civilians from multiple countries including Japan.
  The abductions are a problem that gravely concerns both the national sovereignty and people's life and safety. Japan has been strongly demanding confirmation of the safety of all the abductees and their immediate return to their home countries, a thorough investigation of the facts and the handing over of those guilty of the abductions.
  In 2002 North Korea for the first time admitted to the abductions of Japanese nationals, a fact that it had denied for many years. This resulted in the safe return of five abductees to Japan. But North Korea, giving no sincere account of the many remaining abductees, has continued to insist that "the abduction problem has already been solved."
  The United States of America designated North Korea as a terrorist sponsoring country in 1988, and first mentioned the abduction of foreigners by North Korea as one of the reasons for its designation in the Department of State's Country Reports on Terrorism 2004.
  This has come to exert strong pressure on North Korea to resolve the abduction issue, has encouraged the Japanese people, and has supported Japan's foreign diplomacy in resolutely tackling the abductions. It has been recently reported that the U.S. might remove its designation of North Korea from the list of states sponsoring terrorism in return for such actions as the "disablement" of some of nuclear facilities.
  Abduction is an act of terrorism, and as long as the abductees remain in captivity, the terrorism continues today. The U.S. State Department again identified the abduction problem in its Country Reports on Terrorism 2006 in April this year.
  If the U.S. were to remove the North Korean designation while the abductees are still unable to return home, this would disappoint many Japanese people, raising the concern that this would have a serious impact on the Japan-U.S. alliance.
  Concerns about too readily removing the "terrorist-supporting country" label have risen also inside the U.S., and its House of Representatives has already seen a bill calling for the abductees' return as one of prerequisites for removing the designation. The similar idea has been observed in the Senate.
  In order to quickly rescue all the abductees, the government of Japan should exert utmost diplomatic efforts so that the U.S. should not "remove North Korea from the designated list of states sponsoring terrorism," given the importance of Japan-U.S. relations.
 In view of the above situation, the U.S. should hold fast to the firm policy of not removing North Korea from the designated list of the states sponsoring terrorism.




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